About Cyn

Cynbagley1

Cyn Bagley Mar 28, 2017

(1961-present) I was born in a small hospital in Bella Coola, BC on the reservation. Sometimes when I want to know exactly where I was born, I look up google maps and realize that this place is far far north, somewhere near the ocean and the forests, and just below the arctic circle. My father used to tell stories of bears, fishing, and forest fires. In fact when I was born there had been a huge forest fire and all the men in the area were chosen to help fight it. My mother wasn’t sure that he would make it to my birth. And yes, he did. So I cannot claim to have been adopted.

At this point I only have a few memories, but around my 3rd birthday we moved to California near San Francisco, we left when I was five. I remember wearing sweaters and eating walnuts from our tree in the front yard. I do remember almost choking. This one is interesting. My sister and I used to play with ropes. One of my friends showed me how to tie a noose. Remember we were only four at the time. I tried it out and of course we couldn’t get it off. Dad finally loosened it, and we were banned from playing with the neighbor girl and the rope. I am sure I screamed. I suppose that is why I still hate to wear anything around my throat.

By the time I was sixteen, we had moved so many times that I wasn’t sure what town or city to claim as my home. We were living in the high desert of Utah. When I first saw the place, I was sure that my father had lost his mind. It was nothing like I had seen before. It took me years to really become comfortable in such a place. Ironically, I now live in the high deserts of Nevada.

I didn’t leave home until I was in my early twenties. Also I was the eldest child of nine children. I know a lot about taking care of babies. I tried to go to college, but never made enough money to finish the job. I did go on a mission to South Africa, where I met some great people. But, what finally changed my entire life is when I joined the Navy at twenty-seven years old.

The US Navy gave me a job (electronics), a chance at travel (Japan, Panama), and a husband. We were married for twenty-one years until he died September, 2014. The Navy also gave me the money to finish my college education, a BA in English Literature.

What I haven’t mentioned is that in 2003 I became ill with a vasculitis disease called Wegener’s Granulomatosis. It was rapid and I almost died in Germany. My blog Living with an unpronounceable disease tells about my journey with a chronic illness. Plus it has a lot of information I have gathered about the disease, medications, and supplement.

Currently I am writing and editing and writing. You can find my ebooks at Amazon Kindle.

Check it out. As for now, I am in fairly good health for a person who has a chronic illness. I am isolated from every day contact with most people. Some folks would think I was a germaphobe if they never knew my story. I have had to learn how to be that way.

Another chapter in my life closed 0n September 2014. My husband, Edward D. Tune (Otto) died.

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Living with an unpronounceable disease